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Fort Worth, Texas - Garvey-Veihl House
Early Landowner Baldwin L. Samuel deeded land in this area to his daughter Mary and her husband Issac Foster in 1876. The Fosters and their daughter Lucy (Lula) and her husband William B. Garvey moved here from Kentucky in 1882 and built a home over-looking the trinity  river on a lot adjacent to this home site. At the time many of the city’s wealthiest families were building impressive homes along Samuels Avenue and the Bluff of the Trinity River.
The Garvey’s bought this lot from the Fosters in 1883 and in 1884 built a small 1-story frame residence. By the late 1890’s they had enlarged the house to its current 2-story Queen Anne style appearance. The house exhibits hallmark features of the style including asymmetrical massing, porches, dormers, and beehive turrets.
The house was bequeathed to Baptist Church Charities following the Garveys deaths in 1915. Merchant Robert C. Veihl and his wife Lena B. bought the home in 1918. It was maintained by the Veihl family until 1959, but was subsequently abandoned and in 1972 faced condemnation. The house was saved and eventually renovated.
The house representative of the Grand Homes that lined Samuels Avenue at the turn of the Century. Fort Worth, Texas - Garvey-Veihl House
Early Landowner Baldwin L. Samuel deeded land in this area to his daughter Mary and her husband Issac Foster in 1876. The Fosters and their daughter Lucy (Lula) and her husband William B. Garvey moved here from Kentucky in 1882 and built a home over-looking the trinity  river on a lot adjacent to this home site. At the time many of the city’s wealthiest families were building impressive homes along Samuels Avenue and the Bluff of the Trinity River.
The Garvey’s bought this lot from the Fosters in 1883 and in 1884 built a small 1-story frame residence. By the late 1890’s they had enlarged the house to its current 2-story Queen Anne style appearance. The house exhibits hallmark features of the style including asymmetrical massing, porches, dormers, and beehive turrets.
The house was bequeathed to Baptist Church Charities following the Garveys deaths in 1915. Merchant Robert C. Veihl and his wife Lena B. bought the home in 1918. It was maintained by the Veihl family until 1959, but was subsequently abandoned and in 1972 faced condemnation. The house was saved and eventually renovated.
The house representative of the Grand Homes that lined Samuels Avenue at the turn of the Century. Fort Worth, Texas - Garvey-Veihl House
Early Landowner Baldwin L. Samuel deeded land in this area to his daughter Mary and her husband Issac Foster in 1876. The Fosters and their daughter Lucy (Lula) and her husband William B. Garvey moved here from Kentucky in 1882 and built a home over-looking the trinity  river on a lot adjacent to this home site. At the time many of the city’s wealthiest families were building impressive homes along Samuels Avenue and the Bluff of the Trinity River.
The Garvey’s bought this lot from the Fosters in 1883 and in 1884 built a small 1-story frame residence. By the late 1890’s they had enlarged the house to its current 2-story Queen Anne style appearance. The house exhibits hallmark features of the style including asymmetrical massing, porches, dormers, and beehive turrets.
The house was bequeathed to Baptist Church Charities following the Garveys deaths in 1915. Merchant Robert C. Veihl and his wife Lena B. bought the home in 1918. It was maintained by the Veihl family until 1959, but was subsequently abandoned and in 1972 faced condemnation. The house was saved and eventually renovated.
The house representative of the Grand Homes that lined Samuels Avenue at the turn of the Century. Fort Worth, Texas - Garvey-Veihl House
Early Landowner Baldwin L. Samuel deeded land in this area to his daughter Mary and her husband Issac Foster in 1876. The Fosters and their daughter Lucy (Lula) and her husband William B. Garvey moved here from Kentucky in 1882 and built a home over-looking the trinity  river on a lot adjacent to this home site. At the time many of the city’s wealthiest families were building impressive homes along Samuels Avenue and the Bluff of the Trinity River.
The Garvey’s bought this lot from the Fosters in 1883 and in 1884 built a small 1-story frame residence. By the late 1890’s they had enlarged the house to its current 2-story Queen Anne style appearance. The house exhibits hallmark features of the style including asymmetrical massing, porches, dormers, and beehive turrets.
The house was bequeathed to Baptist Church Charities following the Garveys deaths in 1915. Merchant Robert C. Veihl and his wife Lena B. bought the home in 1918. It was maintained by the Veihl family until 1959, but was subsequently abandoned and in 1972 faced condemnation. The house was saved and eventually renovated.
The house representative of the Grand Homes that lined Samuels Avenue at the turn of the Century.

Fort Worth, Texas - Garvey-Veihl House

Early Landowner Baldwin L. Samuel deeded land in this area to his daughter Mary and her husband Issac Foster in 1876. The Fosters and their daughter Lucy (Lula) and her husband William B. Garvey moved here from Kentucky in 1882 and built a home over-looking the trinity  river on a lot adjacent to this home site. At the time many of the city’s wealthiest families were building impressive homes along Samuels Avenue and the Bluff of the Trinity River.

The Garvey’s bought this lot from the Fosters in 1883 and in 1884 built a small 1-story frame residence. By the late 1890’s they had enlarged the house to its current 2-story Queen Anne style appearance. The house exhibits hallmark features of the style including asymmetrical massing, porches, dormers, and beehive turrets.

The house was bequeathed to Baptist Church Charities following the Garveys deaths in 1915. Merchant Robert C. Veihl and his wife Lena B. bought the home in 1918. It was maintained by the Veihl family until 1959, but was subsequently abandoned and in 1972 faced condemnation. The house was saved and eventually renovated.

The house representative of the Grand Homes that lined Samuels Avenue at the turn of the Century.

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